Home Movies Reviews ‘Susuk’ Netflix Movie Review - The Supernatural Comedy of Errors

‘Susuk’ Netflix Movie Review - The Supernatural Comedy of Errors

The movie follows Ayu’s quest to rescue her sister, Laras, trapped in a curse between life and death, unleashing chaos in their village as she navigates the perilous realms of mystical forces and familial bonds.

Anjali Sharma - Mon, 04 Mar 2024 14:39:08 +0000 1081 Views
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"Susuk," oh, "Susuk," the 2023 flick that's like a mystical rollercoaster ride through a theme park of family drama, curses, and questionable life choices. Directed by Ginanti Rona and penned by Husein M. Atmodjo, this Indonesian spectacle is a buffet of emotions, leaving you wondering if you should applaud or scratch your head. Starring the trio of Hana Malasan, Ersya Aurelia, and Jourdy Pranata, it's a film that makes you question your life choices, much like the characters on screen question theirs.


Let's dive into the positives, shall we? The plot of "Susuk" is like the intricate dance of a mosquito trying to evade a swat. It's engaging, it's annoying at times, but you can't help but follow it. Ayu, played by the determined Ersya Aurelia, takes on the Herculean task of rescuing her sister Laras (Hana Malasan) from a curse that seems more complicated than your grandma's knitting pattern. The narrative unfolds like a cat chasing its tail – you're not sure where it's going, but you're entertained nevertheless.


The performances are like a bag of mixed candies – some sweet, some jaw-breakingly intense. Hana Malasan as Laras brings an air of mystique to the cursed sex worker like a magician pulling rabbits out of a hat, but instead of rabbits, it's the consequences of messing with magical amulets. Ersya Aurelia, our fearless Ayu, is the protagonist you root for, even if you're not entirely sure why. Jourdy Pranata, as Arman, is like that sidekick in every adventure movie who tries to be cool but ends up tripping over their own feet. The trio's chemistry is like a chaotic symphony – not always harmonious, but undeniably entertaining.


The exploration of themes in "Susuk" is like a philosophical debate at a dinner party – you're not sure if you agree with everything, but you nod along. Sisterhood, the dangers of meddling with curses, and the importance of self-acceptance are thrown into the narrative blender, creating a smoothie of life lessons. It's like drinking kale – you know it's good for you, but do you really want to finish the glass?


Now, let's stroll down the shady alley of negatives, shall we? Unanswered questions in "Susuk" are like those socks that vanish in the laundry – you know they exist, but you're left wondering where they went. Was it a possession? Was it a cosmic mix-up? The movie plays coy, leaving you with more loose ends than a sneaker without shoelaces. It's the kind of ambiguity that leaves you scratching your head, not in awe, but in confusion.


The resolution, oh boy, the resolution is like trying to fold a fitted sheet – you know it's supposed to be neat and tidy, but good luck making sense of the mess. The attempt to break the curse brings chaos to the village, like a bull in a china shop, and not the poetic kind. It's like watching a circus act where the juggler drops all the balls – you appreciate the effort, but the execution leaves you cringing. If chaos was an art form, "Susuk" would be the avant-garde masterpiece nobody quite understands.


And then we have the vanity warning. "Susuk" is like that friend who constantly reminds you to eat your vegetables – well-intentioned, but a tad annoying. The cautionary tale about the perils of seeking beauty at any cost is delivered with the subtlety of a sledgehammer. It's like being handed a pamphlet on the dangers of overeating while you're halfway through a tub of ice cream. We get it; beauty has its price. Can we get back to the curses and chaos now?


In conclusion, "Susuk" is a wild ride through a mystical carnival, where curses are the cotton candy of the supernatural world. The performances, like fireworks on a cloudy night, have their moments of brilliance but can be overshadowed by the fog of unanswered questions and a resolution that feels like a magic trick gone wrong. It's a movie that wants to impart wisdom about life and vanity, but sometimes you just want to enjoy the spectacle without being handed a moral compass. So, buckle up, grab your mystical amulets, and prepare for a journey that's equal parts baffling and amusing. Because in the world of "Susuk," even the curses come with a side of comedic chaos. Cheers to the mystical mayhem!


Final Score - [5.5/10]
Reviewed by - Anjali Sharma
Follow @AnjaliS54769166 on Twitter
Publisher at Midgard Times

 

 

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